If the Shoe (Name) Fits...

Oct 27th 2011

Walking through a warehouse-style shoe store, I couldn't help but notice how many of the shoeboxes bore women's names. The DKNY "Sophie" flat; the The Mephisto "Alison" mary jane. Why those names and not others? What kind of names do shoemakers choose most? And do certain names match certain shoes?

To find out, I turned to a vast shoe data depository: Zappos.com. I searched Zappos for shoe models named for 100 different popular girls' names. (More methodology detail below.)

The top female shoe names:

1. Bella
2. Madison
3 (tie). Chloe
   Olivia
5. Naomi
6 (tie). Julia
   Bailey
8 (tie). Maya
   Taylor
   Kimberly
   Sadie
   Avery

And the popular names with the fewest shoe namesakes (tied at zero):

Stella
Angelina
Valeria
Nevaeh
Aaliyah
Madeline
Gabrielle
Kaitlyn
Katelyn
Aubrey

Some definite trends emerge. The popular shoe names names are visually simpler. They're shorter on average, with standard spellings and mostly straightforward pronunciations. It's definitely about visual/written impact -- the number of syllables in the spoken name doesn't correlate with shoe namesakes at all.

The chosen names are vowel heavy as well. Names ending in a vowel sound averaged 1 1/2 more shoe namesakes than names ending in a consonant sound. That might seem to point to a preference for clearly feminine names, but androgynous usage doesn't turn out to be an issue. Notice, for instance, names like Bailey and Taylor in the top 10.

I also found some differences in the kinds of names given to infants' and kids' shoe models vs. women's. Kids' shoe names are, well, cuddlier. More Bellas and Emmas, fewer Averys and Vanessas.

And now for the finding that surprised me most: they shoemakers aren't choosing very well. I can say this with confidence because there's almost no relationship between the style of name and the style of shoe. I routinely found the same name being applied to spangly flip-flops, sleek leather boots, comfort walking shoes, and leopard-print platform stilettos. For a typical example, here are the three models of shoes called Scarlett:

(Images above are from the Scarlett shoes available for purchase at Zappos.com.)

Now, I can see that there could be value in naming against type. If you're creating a comfort walking shoe, for instance, you might want to avoid comfy, old-fashioned names to keep the words "old lady shoe" far from buyers' minds. But if you're delivering a black, studded, high-heeled cross between a cowboy boot and a motorcycle boot, what the heck does a name like Emma or Amelia do for you? And why would your competitors turn around and apply that same name to an espadrille?

With their apparently random shoe-name matches, the shoemakers aren't using the names to signal ANYTHING about their products. Isn't that a waste of a good name?

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Shoe name methodology:

I looked at the the 100 most popular names for girls in the U.S., after eliminating: names that could be chosen by marketers based on non-name meanings, such as Serenity and London; the name Mary because of thousands of search results for the "mary jane" style of shoes; and the name Eva because search results included the thousands of models with EVA insoles.

Model (not brand) names of women's and girls' shoes (not slippers) were counted at Zappos. Exact spelling matches only. A shoe family (multiple colors, fabrics, etc.) counted as just one model. The name had to be used as a first name, so "Mamma Mia" didn't score for Mia, or "Madison Avenue" for Madison.

And a final note: don't try this at home. Not only was my head swimming after many hours of squinting to tell shoe models apart, but I'm now at serious risk of spending $300 on a really awesome pair of Sophia boots.

Comments

1
October 27, 2011 10:44 AM

Cool post Laura. I've always noticed the girls names on brands of things. I always see Ava, Kimberly, and Madison but could swear I've also seen Kaitlyn as well. The corollary to the shoes would be how often the names appear in bedding ensemble models.

2
By Guest4645745 (not verified)
October 27, 2011 12:11 PM

Also, I somehow got a wig catalogue several years ago. The vast majority of the wigs were given women's names. I guess it's not as relevant to most people's lives as shoes are, and there's no massive database of wigs (as far as I know) but it would be interesting to see how that compared.

For example, here are a bunch of wigs named "Scarlett" to go with your shoe example.

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y172/crana/scarlett.jpg

Just like with the shoes, they vary a lot in style. I think the red one is supposed to relate to Gone with the Wind.

3
By Jane 7 (used to be Jane 6) (not verified)
October 27, 2011 4:14 PM

Ohhh, may I just say that I love the "Scarlet" black peep toes in the picture? I would totally buy those if I hadn't just written my kids' tuition check...

Also, I would be attracted to shoes named "Madison" far more than a baby named Madison... perhaps because Madison Avenue seems right for shoes but wrong for babies?

Lastly, Julia seems too middle-aged to be good branding for a shoe. Unless it is an orthopedic shoe.

4
By mk (not verified)
October 27, 2011 4:49 PM

Perhaps the easier, shorter, more popular names are being given to the more popular shoe styles for a particular brand? If you expect a certain shoe to be big, you want to make it as easy as possible for people to remember. So if brand X is known for great boots and brand Y has awesome flip-flops, they may both go for something easy like Emma.

Also, it makes sense to me that brands may shy away from having name styles be tied to a particular style of shoe on purpose so as not to turn off customers, who may not want to always see their name, say, slapped on all the ugly, clunky shoes wherever they go.

5
By knp-nli (not verified)
October 27, 2011 7:11 PM

I love this post-- so much fun... and the postscript at the bottom: priceless!

My grandma shared family history names with us (maybe a hint that she thinks I should use one?)
For your perusal:

boys:
Thomas Eugene
Catlin Lee
James Edward
Mark Anthony
Charles Dean
Keith Allen
Robert Lee
Albert William
Gene Dwight

girls:
Donna Rae
Cindy Ann
Beulah Mae
Amy Louise
Betty Jean
Opal June
Roberta Lynn
Joyce Marie
Francis Jane
Brenda Lee

6
By Jane 7 (used to be Jane 6) (not verified)
October 27, 2011 8:55 PM

knp: That's a pretty great list - especially the boy list - to work from. I'm kinda jealous of your awesome family names. I really like the combos Thomas Eugene and Albert William.

7
October 27, 2011 10:19 PM

knp-Nice list. My favs are Amy Louise; Opal June; James Edward. They are all simple yet elegant.

8
By T. R. (not verified)
October 28, 2011 2:20 AM

Interesting post. I wonder why they don't relate style to name more. I would suspect there's more of a relation there when it comes to the names they give wedding dresses, going for the long flowery romantic names for the poofier dresses...

I noticed the naming trend on little girl shoes recently, when shopping for my daughter. I had mostly assumed it was just some way to tell them apart when searching for or asking about them, that sounded a little more friendly than model 1A-570 or what have you.

9
By Allison Margaret (not verified)
October 28, 2011 10:28 AM

@zoerhenne - You may have seen Kaitlyn at Target. A lot of their women's shoe style names start with K. I searched Target's website for Kaitlyn and nothing came up, but it could very well have been a previous season's style.

10
By hyz
October 28, 2011 10:44 AM

Maybe rather than comparing across all shoes, it makes more sense to compare across the shoes in each brand. For instance, let's say that Scarlett is a spunky or sexy name, Bella is pretty, Chloe is cute and fun, Sadie is a bit retro, Olivia is graceful, and and Taylor is tomboyish. You could (hypothetically) have boots, heels, and sandals that meet all of those descriptions. So those boots above seem the least "Scarlett" to me, but I followed the link and looked up all the other boots that Rieker makes for women, and I can see how the boot pictured, with its relatively slim line, trendy look, and stylish fur trim, got the Scarlett moniker, I guess. Incidentally, Rieker has lots of neat names, including Astrid, Swetlana, Eike, Fenja, Sybille, Noomi--sounds like we may have a non-US/English namer here, in which case, there could be something else going on, too--Scarlett may have a very different feel to them than it does to us.

11
October 28, 2011 11:12 AM

posted this on the last thread just now, but am not sure if anyone's still reading that, so i thought i'd repost. it is excessively long...

alli/zoerhenne,

i wanted to weigh in because i was just pondering this the other day. i mean it's easy to see why all the confusion exists. noel is the french word for christmas. so, grossly oversimplifiying, it comes to america, where either its pronunciation is anglicized (to nole/no-uhl) for boys or its spelling is anglicized (to noelle) for girls. to english speakers, it makes more sense for no-ELLE to be spelled "noelle," and it makes more sense if noel is pronounced nole-no-uhl. so it was adjusted either way. but then there are people who will be familiar with its french roots and want to retain both the spelling and the pronunciation because they feel it is more authentic. i imagine the thought process is something like this: "well, the french word is noel, and that is the word that means christmas; it is pronounced no-ELLE, so i don't see any need to tack on that extra -le. i'm going to keep the french roots, and name my daughter noel, pronounced no-ELLE."

(it doesn't seem to work that way for boys though. i am guessing that few people name their sons noel and retain the original pronunciation of no-ELLE (few english speaking people at least--i do not know whether or how the name is used in france). the boys' name seems to be pretty firmly locked into noel with the anglicized pronunciation.)

anyway, it's an interesting topic. i was trying to decide where i would fall. i can understand alli's family's position: the word, as it relates to christmas, is always noel. i definitely appreciate wanting to retain that authenticity. but i think that were i to use it for myself, i would use noelle. simply because to me, noel, when used as an english name, is always noel/no-uhl and is male. and i wouldn't want people to see my daughter's name and either assume she was a boy or mispronounce her name. names are anglicized all the time. isn't it kathleen that has the original irish spelling of caitlin? (please correct me if i'm wrong.) there are plenty of names that are anglicized so that they better fit the conventions of our language, so it's nothing new or unusual. noelle, despite the two extra letters, still retains its strong christmas meaning for me, but it's *definitely female* and it's *definitely* pronounced no-elle. i like the unambiguity of that.

i'd be interested in the use of it in france though. does anyone know? is it a name in france? based on my (limited) knowledge of french, i'm guessing they would use noel for boys and noelle for girls (just based on other french names such as emmanuel for boys and emmanuelle for girls). so from that point of view (if i'm correct), noelle *is* authentically french.

12
October 28, 2011 2:32 PM

update:
based on my google research,
noel and noelle are the french names used in france (although they both have the two dots (diacritics?) over the 'e'). as far as i can tell, in france, they are both pronounced the same--no-ELLE--but noel is the spelling for boys and noelle is the spelling for girls. it is really only english-speaking people who sometimes use noel for girls, but they are in the minority (noel for girls is not in the top 1,000).

noelle, for girls, is currently ranked 366.
noel, for boys, is currently ranked 479.

so it looks like i was wrong about noelle being an anglicized spelling; it's quite french.

13
October 28, 2011 2:56 PM

emilyrae - It's not quite France, but I can tell you that in Quebec, although neither Noel nor Noelle is frequently given, when used, Noel is always male and Noelle is always female.

Both are pronounced No-ELLE, but the spelling indicates sex. It's like Daniel/Danielle, Michel/Michelle, etc, where the male and female versions are pronounced the same way but spelled differently. It's not anglicized spelling at all. In fact, the opposite -- it's giving the male version of the name to a girl because it sounds the same as the female version that is the Anglicization.

As for the two little dots over the "e" (called the accent tréma/dieresis/umlaut) is used to indicate that the two vowels of the diphthong are pronounced separately. That's what makes the pronunciation of No-el.

Another example is the word "mais". In French it's written "maïs", giving it (more or less) the pronunciation "mah-yee" instead of "may" (the final "s" is essentially silent)

14
October 28, 2011 3:10 PM

Allison Margaret-You may be right, that is one of my favorite stores.

hyz-Interesting analysis.

emilyrae-You said the same thing I was trying to say, only much more eloquently. I wasn't doubting that Noel was an authentic spelling and usable for a girl. Only that I would spell it as Noelle because I am an American and would not prefer the inevitable gender confusion. Indeed it was on my list for my daughter btw.

Karyn-Just to make things difficult (but not to engage in a pronunciation discussion) I say Daniel/Danielle in a slightly different way. Daniel=Dan-yuhl where the last syllable is a bit swallowed/slurred like the -le at the end of table/apple/etc. Danielle=Dan-yell where the two syllables are distinctly separate and the latter is like the beginning of yellow.

15
October 28, 2011 3:11 PM

karyn,
yay, thank you! after my original post, i poked around and realized that noelle wasn't anglicized at all, and that if anything, it is noel on a girl that is anglicized, but i am relieved to have the imput of someone from an actual francophone country. thanks!

16
October 28, 2011 3:15 PM

oh, i missed zoerhenne's post!

zoerhenne,
i think karyn meant that in french, daniel and danielle are the same. the same way that noel and noelle and michel and michelle are the same in french. in english, i would agree, daniel and danielle are definitely different.

it does definitely look like you are right that noel would cause gender confusion--not just in america, but also in francophone countries. noelle seems to be far and away the most common spelling for girls in both english and french (and i, like you, prefer to avoid gender confusion).

17
October 28, 2011 3:31 PM

Yes, emilyrae, you're right that I meant that the pronunciation in French was the same. In English, they are most definitely different, with the female version being the one used for both in French.

(Also, not to engage in a political discussion, but just so you know, Quebec has failed in its attempts to become an independent country and is actually a French province within the predominantly Anglophone country of Canada.)
:)

18
October 28, 2011 3:21 PM

actually, reflecting on how daniel and danielle are the same in french, but different in english, and how mich(a)el and michelle are the same in french but different in english, it is rather fitting that noel and noelle be pronounced differently in english as well. :]

19
October 28, 2011 3:24 PM

oh, karyn, yes, right! i think i just meant that i consider canada a (sort of) francophone country even though i know that they are mostly english speaking.

20
October 28, 2011 3:41 PM

Emilyrae, I never thought about that before, but I think you're right that it's fitting for the names to be said differently in English. When speaking French, I would pronounce Noel the same as Noelle (whether in the context of the name or Christmas), but when speaking English I say Noel distinctly differently from Noelle (somewhere between "Nole" and "No-wl").

21
October 28, 2011 5:47 PM

Fascinating post! I had always wondered about the preponderance of shoes named Kate, so as a shoe person I'm delighted to see a quantitative treatment. I agree that the name choices are more apt when considered in the context of the collection.

I'm also delighted to announce that I had a Rupert James last week! We had a stint in the NICU and special care nursery which is coming to an end, happily! It meant that we got a lot of feedback on his name from myriad medical professionals... Very few mentions of Mr Murdoch!

22
By Amy3
October 28, 2011 6:20 PM

@lucubratrix, congratulations! I love the name Rupert James and it fits nicely with your older son's name.

23
October 28, 2011 6:24 PM

Thomas Eugene is my father's name and my brother who is a junior. My dad goes by Eugene and my brother by Tom. I agree it is a nice name combination. Thomas is too common for my taste as a first name but I like Thomas and Eugene both as middle names. I used to dislike Eugene because it seems like Hollywood turned it into the default name for nerdy characters but that doesn't matter to me anymore ... nerds are cool now and Eugene is starting to sound more and more like a strong traditional name ready for a comeback.

24
October 28, 2011 9:20 PM

Congratulations, lucubratrix!!

This post reminds me that in middle school I got a wonderful bedspread that I adored called Michelle. When I went to college I got a new bedspread called Elizabeth. Of course I felt affinity to the latter because of the name, but I always associate the name Michelle with beautiful flowers, probably because of the bedspread.

Are bedspreads still given girls' names? I'll have to do some investigating.

25
October 28, 2011 9:27 PM

emilyrae-That does make a lot more sense to me seeing the other French names that you posted above. I am not studied in French so it never really occurred to me. Thanks so much :)

lucubratrix-Congrats and hugs to you both. I know a stint in the special care nursery (NICU here in US) is no fun. I hope that enjoying Rupert (and your other) is all you need to do from here on out.

26
October 28, 2011 9:27 PM

OK, a quick search shows that girls' bedding does still come named...at times. Some of the designs sport names like "Princess" or "Cowgirl", but many of the sets carry popular names like Olivia, Lily, and Emily. As a card-carrying NE, I find it cozier to think of snuggling up under a Lily coverlet rather than one without a name or one with a bland name like "Twin bedding--cotton/polyester blend".

I think choosing names for bedding would be even more difficult than choosing shoe names, because the risk of sending the wrong message is higher. A duvet named Scarlett carries a different message than one named Lily, don't you think?

27
October 29, 2011 12:09 PM

Very interesting post! I love shoes and I love names, so of course I loved this article.

Re Noel for boys: I would always pronounce it like no-el, not nole. I suppose it makes sense when you look at Joel, but if I was going to use a name that sounded like nole, I would go for Nowell (like Lowell), which is weird, because that definitely looks like it should be two syllables.

Also, new baby name: Rhiot Wade Choate LN
Born to an acquaintance of mine from high school. I don't know if I'm weirded out more by the fact that we're both 20, or by the name she picked for this kid. I suppose it's a mashup of Ryan and Wyatt, but all this name made me think about was the Unwanted post from last week.

28
October 29, 2011 3:58 PM

fancynancy-I'm a little "weirded out" by that name. I try to be nice about the different styles of names on here even if they are not for me. However, I'm not sure that is the best name for anybody. If it were a mashup then why did she not spell it Rhyatt? That would look nicer and make more sense to me. I think Rhiot is going to get spelling mistakes/confusion with Riot and it would make me want to change my name and use Wade.

29
By Jane 7 (used to be Jane 6) (not verified)
October 29, 2011 4:16 PM

Maybe Rhiot is a family surname?

30
October 29, 2011 9:54 PM

@lucubratix, Congratulations!!! I was just thinking you must be due soon. I do love the combo Rupert James. I am glad you are out of NICU and I hope all is well now.

Re Rhiot, I'm definitely not a fan of this one.

@Jane7 - I probably just missed it but are you pregnant again or have you had another bub? I do like your name discussions!

31
October 29, 2011 10:41 PM

If anybody needs a little snowtime challenge for the weekend here is one for you (yes I'm on the EastCoast and got a bit of snow today).
Can you make a family of Alphabetical Duggars? By this I mean the famous 19 child Duggar family which currently have all J names. Can you rename them (following the boy/girl pattern) alphabetically? So A-S in order like this:
1=Boy=A
2/3=Boy/Girl Twins=B+C
4,5,6=Girls=D,E,F
7,8=Boy=G,H
9=Girl=I
10/11=Boy Twins=J+K
12,13,14,15=Boys=L,M,N,O
16,17,18,19=Girls=P,Q,R,S

My choices would be:
Adam; Brian; Chloe
Dianna; Emily; Frances
Gregory; Holden
Ivy; James; Kyle
Lucas; Mitchell; Nicholas; Owen
Phoebe; Quinn; Rachel; Samantha
(or something close to that)

32
October 30, 2011 12:30 AM

Fun game!

Adam (Because I don't think I could get away with Ansel)
Bradley
Cassandra
December
Esperanza
Flora
George
Henry
Isabel
Jude
Kristofer
Linden
Maxwell
Nicolas
Ocean
Paloma
Quetzal
Roberta
Sadie

So kind of a mix of Spanish, nature, Beatles, and classics. I think my favorite on this list is Quetzal, which surprised me because I never would have considered it a name until now. It's a cool mix of Kenzie and Gretl, with the added bonus of being a bird.

Actual thought process: Hmm, Brock would be a good boys name, but I want something longer. Ley seems to be a fashionable ending. Brock + Ley = Brockley. That could work....Oh wait BROCCOLI

Maybe that's how Rhiot happened?

33
By Beth the original (not verified)
October 30, 2011 12:35 AM

Alexander; Bennett; Catherine
Delia; Eleanor; Frances (love that name)
Gilead; Hans
Iris; Jonathan; Kermit
Linden; Melville; Nathaniel; Oscar
Portia; Quinn; Ruth; Simone

Congratulations lucubratrix! That's so exciting.

Rhiot, just, no. I'm sorry, but no.

34
October 30, 2011 12:48 AM

Continuation of the game using coin flip method (because I can't fall asleep)
I got G G B G G G B

Turin
Ulrike
Victor
Wren
Xochtil
Yolanda nn Yoli
Zion

Lesson learned: I'm not a huge fan of the end of the alphabet. S is a good time to stop having kids because there are NO girls T names that I love.

35
October 30, 2011 1:56 AM

Ooh fun game!

August
Boronia, Clement
Delphine, Elodie, Fenella
Giles, Hugo
Isolde
Jonty, Kasper
Llewellyn, Magnus, Ned, Otto
Penelope, Quinn, Romilly, Susannah

I actually find this hard as for some letter I like lots of names and other letters none! It would also be easier if I didn't have to stick to the boy/girl pattern.

for fun if I did the opposite genders I would pick:
Ariadne
Balendin, Cordelia
Dexter, Elliot, Fergus
Genevieve, Harriet
Ignatius
Juliet, Karys
Lucia, Magnolia, Norah, Ottilie
Piers, Quinn, Riordan, Silas

36
By Liz + Louka (not verified)
October 30, 2011 5:02 AM

Off the top of my head, I'd choose:
Angus
Benedict
Cassandra
Deirdre
Emmanuelle
Fern
Gregory
Hamish
Inez
Jeremy
Kenneth
Louis
Milo (but not if I was in Australia)
Nathaniel
Oliver
Perdita
Quella
Rhiannon
Sally

37
October 30, 2011 2:27 PM

I was starting to think I was the only one who noticed shoes had names. :) I won't try this at home.

38
By Amy3
October 30, 2011 2:51 PM

How fun, zoerhenne. Here are my off-the-top-of-my-head ideas.

Abraham (nn Abe), Beatrix, Cosmo
Doris, Elspeth, Freya
Gordon, Harold (nn Hal), Imogen
Jerome, Kellen, Laszlo
Malcolm, Noel (pron. Nole), Oliver
Petra, Quinn, Ramona, Solveig

39
By hyz
October 30, 2011 3:09 PM

Always a fun exercise, and love seeing everyone's choices

August
Beatrix
Calder
Delphine
Eloise
Fern
Graham
Hudson
Iris
Jonah
Kasimir
Leander
Merle
Noah
Orson
Pearl
Quilla
Rosamond
Sylvia

40
October 30, 2011 4:57 PM

Yes hyz a fun exercise. Your list was very much what I would expect as I'm sure mine was to you. The only one on your list that surprised me was Merle. Thoughts behind that?

And turning this back around to shoes for a second Laura, does the same thing happen with men's shoes? Do we find things named Howard(old mans loafer), Colton(cowboy boot), Kaden(kids sneaker), and Michael(dress shoe)?

41
By hyz
October 30, 2011 7:21 PM

Merle is one of my newer favorites--I like its vintage country feel thanks to Merle Haggard, with the added benefit of meaning "blackbird" in French. I just noticed I have both Pearl and Merle in my sibset, though--maybe rhyming doesn't matter with so many kids, but just in case, maybe I should change Merle to the related Merrill...?

42
By TKB
October 30, 2011 9:51 PM

How fun. My lists make me look so super traditional and boring, but I guess that's my style. Also goodness, I'm glad no one is making me name a daughter a Q name.

Amos
Baxter
Cecelia
Dorothy
Eliza
Felicity
Gilbert
Harrison
Ingrid
James
Kenneth
Liam
Mattias
Norman
Oliver
Penelope
Quincy
Rosalind
Susannah

And for funsies, the other way:

Alma
Beatrice
Charles
Douglas
Ezra
Francis
Geneva
Helvetica
Ivan
Julia
Katherine
Louise
Margot
Nina
Octavia
Phillip
Quincy
Robert
Saul

43
By Juli (not verified)
October 31, 2011 12:34 AM

Miscellaneous commentary...

1.) Where did Mary Janes get their name? Are there any other shoe names that (almost) always indicate a particular style? I bought my daughter Juliet shoes today, which are like T-strap Mary Janes; does this name generally go with this style?

2.) Jane 7, I take offense! Julia is not an old-lady name. It's actually quite popular: there was a little boy yelling at his sister in the store the other day, and I had to restrain myself from responding to my name.

3.) For zoerhenne's game, I came up with:
Anthony
Barty
Cecily
Dorothy
Emily
Felicity
Gregory
Henry
Isemay
Jeffrey
Kenny
Larry
Matty
Nicky
Olly
Poppy
Queeny
Rosy
Sidony

(I noticed a theme partway through, but it became nearly impossible to continue, so some of these are nicknames. Some full names to go with them: Bartholomew, Kenelm, Laurence, Matthew, Nicholas, Oliver, Prudence, Quenild, Rosamund.)

My best friend has alphabetical cats. Currently living are Cassandra, Gandalf, Lucia, Odo, Pippa, and Rollo. Odo was supposed to be Nigel, but he's orange. So is Pippa. Rollo is a dark tabby, but he's just _so_ not a Nigel that N has been skipped for now. Oh, and Gandalf fits in his alphabetical spot by age, but he's actually the most recent addition; he's old and grey/white, hence the name. (Some others were Arabella, Baldwin, Drogo, Matilda, and Bubba [who came with his name].)

44
October 31, 2011 2:01 AM

@TKB, I also struggled with Q. I like some of the other suggestions. On the fly Quinn was the only name I could come up with but I'm not that attached to it. I also struggle with K. I generally only like C names and really struggle with K. I also like a disproprtionately large number of A and C names so it's hard to narrow them down.

45
October 31, 2011 8:48 AM

Chimu-Somehow I had missed your list. I think I like the reverse genders better:)

fancynancy-Continuing I would get-
Tabitha; Ursula; Vincent; Wendy; Ximena;Yolanda ;Zachary
(the names for X+Y were the only ones I could think of) I also had a hard time with some of the previous letters and a very easy time with others.

46
By TKB
October 31, 2011 11:24 AM

I did the end of the alphabet this morning, flipping my own coin. It wasn't nearly as hard as I dreaded, it turns out I had to actually agonize over too many choices for V and Z.

Theodore
Uther
Vivienne
Wesley
Xenobia
Ysobel
Zebediah

Other way was a lot harder:

Teodora
Una
Vincent
Willow
Xavier
Yosef
Zuzana

47
By Amy3
October 31, 2011 9:26 AM

@Chimu, I also used Quinn without loving it and had a terrible time with K! The only name I really like is Katherine, but it had to be a boy name.

48
By hyz
October 31, 2011 11:14 AM

Agree on Q and K for boys! I think those are my 2 least favorite letters of the alphabet, name-wise (although U is tough, too)!

To round out the alphabet, I'll do:

Thora
Ursula
Virginia
Winter
Xanthe
Ysolde
Zinnia

or:

Thornton
Urban
Valentin
Walden
Xavier
Yale
Zephyr

49
By Yet Another Guest (not verified)
October 31, 2011 2:12 PM

I want to play, too!

Ambrose
Beatrice
Callum
Daphne
Elodie
Frances
George
Henrik
Iris
James
Kieran
Lachlan
Malcolm
Noel
Orson
Penelope
Quilchena
Rosalind
Severin

50
By Essy01 (not verified)
October 31, 2011 3:01 PM

oooh love the game going on here. had to give it a go...

Arthur
Booth, Constance
Darla, Eloise, Freya
Garland, Hector,
Ingrid
Jack, Kipling
Locke, Martin, Ned, Oscar
Patricia, Quorra, Renee, Sabine

so much fun! :)