gwanjeje

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My Favorite Names
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1
October 24, 2016 05:42 PM

What a lovely tradition! I think it would give your daughter a sense of rootedness to be connected to previous generations that way.

I will say one thing--I know several people whose parents named them double-barrelled names like Anna Beth, Eliza Jane, etc.  When they were young, everyone called them by both names. However, as they got older, people gradually started calling them by just the first name. I'm not sure why that was--perhaps the person started introducing herself as just the first name when meeting new people, or perhaps other people, maybe even her parents, just stopped saying both names out of convenience/efficiency. (People do tend to gravitate toward the easiest thing to say.) So you may name your daughter Anna Jane...but she may end up being called just Anna. Something to consider, anyway. 

2
July 29, 2016 12:22 PM
In Response to Lilia for second girl?

I love the name Lilia! On my list for a future daughter too. :)

However, I think she will have to deal with people thinking she's Lily. A friend of mine named Kristina said that people always thought she was Christy. And several friends named Julia have always had a problem with people calling them Julie. So as long as you're prepared for that...

I love the name Stella too, but one thing to think about is calling their names together—would that be a tongue twister for you?

And for the middle names, what about switching the order to be Lilia Francesca Rose? That flows better to me.

3
June 11, 2016 06:37 AM

Audrey is one of my favorite girl names too, and I've also worried about it being too popular. However, as a previous commenter mentioned, I haven't met any little Audreys! (Though I do know a couple little Aubreys.)

Audrey is such a lovely, classic name, and it goes well with Gemma without being too matchy. Also, if you're in the United States, the actual numbers might be relevant. Although Audrey was ranked #37 for baby girl names in 2015, that translates into just 5,581 babies for the year. Gemma as #267 comes in at 1,166 babies--while the top baby name, Emma, comes in at 20,355 babies. So I personally wouldn't strike Audrey off the list due to relative "popularity." 

4
March 24, 2016 08:42 PM
In Response to Nickname Cal

The first person to come to mind was American president Calvin Coolidge, whose nickname was "Silent Cal." And then I remembered another Cal I know personally, a man in his 60s. I've never met or heard of any Cal younger than that.

When I think about the name itself, it evokes images of a little boy in the 1940s, knees dirty from a pickup game of baseball, running home for dinner when he hears his mother call. :) It's one of those names that isn't common anymore, but yet isn't considered weird or hard to say. Not a nickname to be ashamed of at all.

However, because it's not common anymore, I wonder how likely it will be for him to be called Cal? Would people even think of it nowadays? 

5
March 9, 2016 09:36 AM

Any reason that Charlotte will be her middle name and not her first name? Is it a family name that you don't like enough to use as a first name, or something like that?

6
February 24, 2016 10:32 PM

If by any chance your surname begins with a T, you could go for the nickname derived from initials. For example, Helena Amelia Thomas, Honora Alice Tessari, etc. 

7
February 24, 2016 10:17 PM

I  know of someone named Hatherleigh who went by Hattie when she was growing up (still does, I think, although now by Hatherleigh as well). 

8
January 23, 2016 12:26 PM
In Response to Vivian Mae??

Note: The actress's name is actually Vivien Leigh (cf. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vivien_Leigh and other sources).

Personally, I prefer the spelling Vivien slightly more than Vivian. However, I think that Vivian Mae is an absolutely lovely name! It's not popular in my circles; I don't know any little Vivians, or even any grown-up Vivians.

But as other commenters have pointed out, the 'v' sound is currently popular (as seen in names like Evelyn, Olivia, Avery and Ava). Due to the sound and to the antique name revival, Vivian has been trending up and will likely keep doing so.

That said, it was #98 in 2014 in the U.S., in contrast to #2 Olivia and #5 Ava.

9
January 17, 2016 07:13 PM

Until recently I was thinking I wouldn't want it shortened, and was wondering if there were any way to prevent it! The -th sound is one of my favorite things about the name. But as posters often mention on these threads, nicknames often can't be controlled. Gwen/Gwyn is sounding more pleasant the more I think about it.....Thanks for the feedback!

10
January 11, 2016 06:18 PM

Good suggestion about Gwenyth! I am not sure I like that spelling as much as Gwyneth, but it's still beautiful and it might grow on me...

And so true about the possibility that Ms. Paltrow may take an unfortunate direction. One never knows.

11
January 10, 2016 02:51 PM

I haven't named any actual children yet, but I have so many names on my list that I have a feeling I'll be too afraid to use. Mostly due to what my relatives would say--they have rather traditional name tastes. Even the tamer ones that I do end up choosing are probably going to be "unique" to them.

Some of my probably unusable name crushes for girls are:

Vesper
Halliday
Honor
Rosephanye (okay, I wouldn't actually name a daughter this, but I think it sounds so cool!)
Gentry
Harlow 

And for boys:

Eben
Thane
Soren
Perrin
Valor 

Alas..... 

12
January 10, 2016 02:24 PM
In Response to Need A Third Opinion

I love William Dean. It just sounds so classic. Levi Dean makes me think of Levi jeans. 

My first instinct would be to pronounce Jana as "yahn-uh" because I knew a girl with that name/pronunciation. But I think the typical American instinct would be to pronounce it "ja-nuh" (with the short a like in "apple"). The only exception would be if you were in a certain area where there were a lot of German descendents and the name Jan ("yahn") was common for a man. As it is in certain areas of Washington state, for example. 

Personally, my favorite of your girl names is Victoria Francine. Other 'v' names that I don't think have been suggested yet are Viviana, Vivienne, Vanessa, Vesper (though that doesn't seem like your style), Veronica, Venice, and Vienna (the last two if you don't mind place names). 

13
January 10, 2016 02:07 PM
In Response to Lucie or Lucy

I know someone who named her cat Lucie Maud (but it's not just a cat's name to me!), and I never thought the spelling was wrong. I just thought it was the French version. Personally, I think it's lovely. Lucie gives off a more romantic vibe to me (but without being too flowery), while Lucy gives off a more straightfoward, practical vibe. But it's true, you or your daughter would probably be correcting spelling quite a bit. 

14
December 28, 2015 07:09 PM

Sabina is a saint's name according to http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=756. Very close to Sabine on your list, but hopefully religious enough for your husband?

15
December 17, 2015 11:33 AM

I had a relative named Walter, and his only nickname was Walt. I would probably think of "Wally" as a nickname for Wallace, actually, not Walter. So I don't think you need to worry about it as inevitable. :) 

16
December 12, 2015 07:45 PM

Would the spelling Graem or Graeme be an option? If I just saw Graham written down, I would probably pronounce it as "gram" based on graham crackers. But I love the "gray-em" pronunciation with the nickname Gray. 

17
December 3, 2015 06:48 PM

Personally, if I met an Eleanor nicknamed Lily, I would wonder why her parents hadn't just named her Lily to begin with. :) Unless, of course, Lily was a completely unplanned nickname, like the ones some children give themselves (or their siblings) when they can't pronounce their names. 

What about Bet, Bets, Betty or Betsy for Beatrice? 

18
December 2, 2015 09:36 PM

I know or know of quite a few girls named Olivia across a wide variety of ages, from toddlers to 20s. However, I know only a few girls named Ava (and one Aeva), and only in the toddler or baby age range. So based purely on my personal experience, I would say that Olivia seems to be a more consistent name, while Ava seems to be a more recent revival. I haven't checked stats to confirm that yet. 

19

Congrats!! Love the name you chose. :)

20

Oh, whoops, just read your post again and caught the 5-letter middle name thing too. Well, some of the suggestions above fit that!