KellyXY

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My Recent Blog Comments
1
July 29, 2015 08:22 PM
In Response to Names on resumés

Thanks for clarifying about your location/nationality! (Whenever I see words spelled the "British" way I usually see that as a clue that the poster is not from the U.S.) As for my comment, another alternative in the "sensitive" cases where you don't want to "out" yourself but also don't want to act like you overlooked or lied about the question (that I also suggested to the transgender people I described) is to put down "none that are relevant" or something similar if true in your case (of course if there is something that they can and may want to check under your former name you basically don't have a choice).

2
July 29, 2015 08:13 AM
In Response to Names on resumés

One thing I do want to point out about the "other names you've used or been known by" question - for people who've had a "sensitive" name change who may not want to disclose the former name (the converse of what you're saying), when it's a private entity protected by anti-discrimination laws, they usually care only about names used in the context of what they'd be checking. For example, if you were adopted as a child, you do not need to disclose the name you were originally given at birth for most job or loan applications (as seen at the link below - broken up so it doesn't register as spam).

http: (two slashes) www (dot) askamanager (dot) org/2013/03/short-answer-sunday-7-short-answers-to-7-short-questions-32.html

In cases like a transgender person (as I've worked with several of them) or someone who legally changed their name for reasons described in the OP of this discussion, it depends on whether or not the employer, etc. needs to know it to verify your work/school/criminal/etc. history properly. Often times for a background check you can ask that you give the sensitive information straight to whoever is running the check.

Sorry if this is a bit OT, but I'm posting this for example someone contemplating changing an already-born child's name, and they ask if they make the change if they'd have to list the original name in cases like these when they're older. In the aforementioned cases the answer is (for the most part) no. Of course for example if you're applying for a passport or a visa from a government it's different, or getting a job that requires a security clearance, but employers, banks, etc. typically have no need to know a name changed before you were old enough to have any "adult" records.

ETA: I looked at your profile, and I saw you refer to yourself as "mum" - my comments are geared towards those in the U.S., so where you live it may be different. Often in these cases here the question is worded so as to only ascertain those names within the scope of their interest (e.g. other names you have "obtained credit under" for a loan application instead of the more general wording).

3
May 14, 2015 07:41 AM

He's transgender (female-to-male) and looking for a more masculine name.

4
May 8, 2015 10:23 AM

I was partially wrong about Taylor - the gender ratio widened again with 3,782 girls and 691 boys for 5.47 girls per boy (but still narrower than it was in 2012). Still it probably wouldn't make a "fastset falling" list for boys.

5
April 27, 2015 02:09 PM

Laura, I did base that on the gender ratio. I'll play the numbers using the recent SSA data for Taylor:

2013 - 4,108 girls and 818 boys = 5.02 girls per boy

2012 - 4,847 girls and 882 boys = 5.50 girls per boy

2011 - 5,184 girls and 896 boys = 5.79 girls per boy

2010 - 5,886 girls and 951 boys = 6.19 girls per boy

2009 - 7,575 girls and 1,092 boys = 6.94 girls per boy

Notice how after each year the ratio does narrow - so it looks like I'm right.

Or to put it another way between 2009 and 2013 Taylor dropped by 46% for girls but only 25% for boys.

I do think that Taylor for boys will keep dropping like you said, but will drop at a faster rate for girls like the numbers above demonstrate.

6
April 27, 2015 10:19 AM

I don't think Taylor would be the top pick for falling-fast-on-boys-due-to-usage-on-girls, since now that it's past peak for both genders the ratio is actually narrowing with a larger drop on girls (this has also happened with Kelly and Robin for example - falling for both genders but more so for girls). Your point mainly applies to names near their overall peak (Harper or Riley would probably be a better example) - once the name becomes "dated" the gap tends to narrow if once more popular for girls by attrition.

7
March 26, 2015 03:09 PM

It depends on the child's age and the state's policy. In some states you can get a completely new BC without any mention of the changes, in others they'll add a note or an attachment reflecting the change, and in a few they won't make any BC changes barring special circumstances. (If the reason for the change is something like an adoption or a gender change it's more likely but not certain they'd issue a new certificate without the past data.)

8
February 26, 2015 12:50 PM
In Response to Baby Name or Typo?

A source of typos that skews the stats is gender misrecording, which is why you see for example Jennifer and John appearing in the wrong gender's Top 1,000 (back before everything was computerized and error was thus more common the most common names often had enough errors to cause that). That's why as an example although you probably don't know any real-life boys named Sue the stats show some boy Susans out there.

9
February 6, 2015 06:37 AM

@HungarianNameGeek: The reason I commented as such was that it seemed like from your last post that you'd consider any name other than the one on the person's birth certificate not to be a "real" name. Since you clarified I now understand. I also brought up the issue of birth certificate amendments because in some legal contexts even one's "birth name" is not fixed at birth (for instance they generally want the mother to be listed under her "maiden" name on her children's birth certificates - if her name was changed for a reason that amended, or in some cases could amend, her birth certificate then they want the name after, and not before, the name change). (A BC amendment essentially means the information was deemed to be incorrect and should be changed in the same way if they got for example the date or place of birth wrong, hence the distinction from for example a marriage-based name change in which the maiden name remains as such. I think in most cases of stage-becoming-legal name changes the BC wouldn't be changed though.)

A fair example of how "stage" names should be treated is Wikipedia's page of stars who assumed such names - one is listed there only if the reason for the name change was for one's profession (and some "gray area" cases like Miley Cyrus). If you go by a different name or changed your name for another reason (e.g. adoption, marriage, gender change, you go by a "standard" nickname or your middle name, etc.) that doesn't count. In the Bob Dylan case, since he (probably) wouldn't be known as such were it not for his music career, your reasoning is valid (but it wouldn't be if for example you said Chaz Bono's name was just his stage name). The same logic applies to what I touched above on how a parent's name gets listed on the child's BC - what the parent's name would be absent any name changes from marriage.

10
February 5, 2015 02:45 PM

@HungarianNameGeek - In some cases a legal name change DOES amend the birth certificate (at least in the U.S.; in Hungary it may be different). This frequently occurs with adoptions and transgender people (and with the latter you better dare not call the name they chose to match their gender identity a "non-real" name). It can happen with name changes for certain other (non-marriage-related) reasons as well.

Since Bob Dylan's children have been given the Dylan surname I side with Floriography that in his case it's more than just a stage name or pseudonym (now it would be different if his family in private life still used his original surname). Like Floriography said, would you consider a woman's married name, or for another example if you're the child of a parent who had namer's remorse their second and ultimate name choice for you, a "non-real" name?

11
January 5, 2015 11:00 AM

No problem - I wasn't trying to disagree with you, but rather that when they ask such a question in the cases I touched on they're usually interested in whether or not any relevant records subject to verification are under any other names and not necessarily what is or was your legal name (a converse example from the childhood name change scenario is if part of your credit, employment, criminal, etc. history is under an alias/assumed name/pseudonym/etc. then you would have to mention said name - something to bear in mind if you decide to go by another name informally because if the name makes it onto any of those records it would count).

As for where you live, I often assume that someone who uses "British" spellings is from somewhere outside the States (but I guess I was wrong in your case!).

12
January 5, 2015 10:03 AM

Re: If he'd need to list his former name in cases like those you mentioned - It may depend on how old he is and whether or not he's had anything relevant under the name. If he just turned 18 and never had a bank account before then it likely wouldn't apply in that case for example (like how if you were adopted as a child the name before the adoption wouldn't count - likewise for anyone who has remorse on what they named their child and is contemplating changing it). Same thing with applying for jobs, etc. - if they need to know the former name to check all of your credentials/background etc. he'd have to, if not then no (unless it's for a security clearance, etc. where they check all of your life). (Since lucubratrix may not be from the U.S. given she used "mum" in her profile I thought I'd clarify what I'm saying is how it would apply in the U.S. - at least when it comes to non-government situations where you may be illegally discriminated against if you had to give the former name out unnecessarily like if you changed your name to assimilate or you changed gender.)

13
November 13, 2014 09:32 AM

@Beth01 - Actually Devin is quite a bit more common for boys (Devon too).

ETA: The links didn't post, but you can search NameVoyager yourself and see.

14

At this point Gloria would actually be as likely - if not more likely - to be a grandmother of our readers (the peak was in the 1920s-40s, so for the younger parents on here that would be well within grandmother range - for those of Mrs. Wattenberg's generation your statement of it being a "mom name" would be true though).

15
October 10, 2014 11:26 AM
In Response to Name Conjugator

Forgot on the Spanish conjugations to include usted with él/ella and ustedes with ellos/ellas (I just now remembered that those are conjugated the same).

16
September 26, 2014 09:00 AM

How about Amélie, the French version? (After seeing the movie by that name I really like the name.) Since you mentioned using Amelia to get the nicknames Amy and Molly I like those as standalone names too (and Amy isn't as popular as it was when you were growing up).

17
September 4, 2014 05:25 PM

@MissyHolland - Actually Amelie has been in the Top 1,000 since 2003 (the SSA ignores accent marks).

18
June 15, 2014 07:06 AM

I think for a 2014 girl Lindsay would be even more dated-in-a-bad-way than Linda, since the former is a surname/boy's name turned girl's name (which tend to date unfavorably afterwards) while the latter at least has some pedigree as a feminine name.

19
June 5, 2014 04:04 PM

Does your DH have any kind of amended birth certificate including one that shows both names, or has nothing been changed on it (the way you described it I'm not sure)? If not, what state was he born in (if you and he are okay with sharing)? Like I mentioned upthread (and on one of your other comments, which I edited by mistake today) the majority of states do allow some degree of amending to be done (some will issue an all-new one without mentioning the change, while others the old info is still visible but the new is added). And why would he need to show his name change papers every time he does taxes, since once you send proof of the name change to the IRS (e.g. the first time filing taxes after the change) they shouldn't need it again (no more than you would after you got married)? Trust me, I've had contact with several transgender people and thus are aware of the ins and outs of making sure as much is changed over as possible (if your DH was born in MA they're one of the few states that don't normally amend BCs because of a name change but have a special rule in place for transgender people).

Another point I want to bring up from the same experience and the lady here (scroll down to see my reply), is that when it goes to time to fill out the birth certificate form for your DC (given that I saw another post where you're expecting), if they ask for his "birth name" be sure and ask someone from the VS office what name they want. That probably won't be an issue since he's male and most states just ask for the father's name as-is, since what they typically actually want is the name as it would be without any marriages (and not necessarily the name given at birth if different), and men don't normally change their last name when marrying. They generally do want you to take into account names changed for other reasons, like adoption or personal preference (as in his and the blogger's case). (The forms may not spell out that detail for the sake of space and being a less-common scenario, but it's something I've asked about.)

20
June 5, 2014 03:35 PM

Re; her birth certificate - In many states when you legally change your name (for reasons not related to a marriage of course) your birth certificate gets (or can be) amended (or a note attached) - a fact not well-known outside the adoption and transgender communities. (I don't know if the OP amended hers or not, but when people talk about the hassle of your birth certificate and other IDs not matching they need to bear that in mind.)