ksomething

Name

Kate or Katie, depending on context.

About Me

Mother of two: William Jonathan "Jack" and Elizabeth Violet "E.V./Evie"

My Favorite Names

No favorite names yet.

My Recent Blog Comments
1
May 12, 2014 12:58 PM

Interesting! This is what I find in the 2013 data: 

Males:
61 Percy
60 Perseus
8 Percival

_____


Females:
167 Persephone
14 Persephonie
12 Persephanie
5 Persephony

12 Persais
6 Persayus 

2
May 12, 2014 12:03 PM

As others commented, this is much more about dialect than education.  I majored in linguistics and still have trouble distinguishing between vowels my native dialect doesn't recognize differences between.  I can hear the difference between cot and caught if I pay close attention, but I suspect I only pronounce them differently when making a concerted effort.  An Aaron once thanked me for pronouncing his name correctly (not like Erin) but I still can't do it on command. 

With some vowels, the consonants following them do affect the sound, such as the a in cat versus can.  Physically, it would be difficult not to nasalize the vowel before a nasal consonant. Or maybe it isn't physically difficult, but just an English phonetic rule and other languages handle it differently. (Phonetics was a fascinating, but far from easy course!) At any rate, neighboring sounds have a huge impact on one another.  Whether it's a double consonant may also have a relationship with the sound of the vowel, but because the English language has adopted words from so many other languages and spelling is often (silent t for me!) divorced from pronunciation, there is no hard and fast rule, like there would be in, say, Italian, where a double consonant means it is pronounced different from a single consonant.  

The Oxford/serial comma and number of spaces after a period (or colon) are simply taught differently depending on how the elementary school teacher learned.  Believe it or not, even the Oxford style guide has dropped the serial comma where it wouldn't assist in clarification of meaning.  As a fan of the serial comma, it makes me sad. 

3
May 12, 2014 11:00 AM

The 50-something Croatian man I know named Milan pronounces it to close friends in the US as rhyming with "Dylan" but generally introduces himself to American strangers as "Milano" with the stress on the middle LAH syllable. I suspect the Dylan-like pronunciation is still somewhat anglicised and it's really more of an ee vowel in that first syllable.  

4
March 21, 2014 10:21 AM

That never would have occurred to me.  Because the secondary stress is on the "air" in Aviary that is missing from Avery, and because Avery is a common enough name that I wouldn't be searching for other similar-sounding words, it just doesn't seem like an issue.  

Besides, aviaries seem like nice places.  Associations would be positive, I'd think. 

5
March 21, 2014 10:08 AM

I guess my parents were ahead of their time! We were born in the early '80s. 

6
March 21, 2014 09:58 AM

I've never fully understood the desire for unique names because, as a Kate/Katie/Katherine, I've always loved meeting people who share my name.  It creates an instant (albeit small) bond with new people.  (Plus it's always fun to go out in groups of 3+ Katies and introduce ourselves to people.)  But because those people usually have a name that is different from mine in some way (e.g. my friends nicknamed Katie who are officially Catherine, Kathleen, and Caitlyn and other Katherines who go by Kathy or Cat) it doesn't feel oppressively SAME, if that makes any sense.  I still felt unique (especially when, growing up, I was the only one whose initials, when spoken, pronounced my name: KT or KDT.)

So I gave my kids the same thing: top 10 first name + common or rising nickname, with a twist. Luckily, they've both also loved meeting others with their names so far.  Again, there's an instant bond.  But we have yet to meet anyone with both the same first and nickname as either.   

Maybe I'd feel differently if I had a common last name, but I've also somewhat envied the few Jennifer Smiths I've known, so perhaps not.  At any rate, it's a very satisfying way to name babies (especially if you happen to be drawn to popular names, but fear their popularity -- it's not that bad!)

7

Not remotely a deal-breaker! I love the sibset and think they go perfectly together. Love both names.  

8
October 9, 2013 02:31 PM
In Response to It's a boy!

A former coworker got annoyed with Pammy, so I called her El(l)a.  You didn't have to be Pammy!

9
October 9, 2013 02:06 PM

I'm putting my money ($0.00) on Donor Hunter Carmine Goldberg.  

I love her names.  

10
October 9, 2013 01:39 PM
In Response to Preschool class

I have no idea how to pronounce it, but I look forward to finding out! I googled to find out more about the name and the only hit as a name turned out to be a poor-quality PDF really saying "Nancy."  The other hits were English+gobbledegook, Portuguese, or Slovak.  There's a distinct possibility that it was a typo or I mis-read it, as well. 

11
October 9, 2013 01:26 PM
In Response to Preschool class

I tried to look up the census data, but the site is down due to the federal shut down.  :-/  But the GreatSchools website seems more useful, anyway.  It says: 

Hispanic: 39%; Black: 28%; White 22%; Asian: 8%; 2+ races: 2% American Indian/Alaska native: 1%; Hawaiian native/Pacific Islander: 1%

I think it's particularly interesting because the high school is far less diverse, so it must be something about our little neighbohood(s). The high school has White: 40%; Black: 35%; Hispanic: 17%; Asian: 7%; 2+: 1%.  I was also surprised the Asian population isn't higher, but then I realized my kids' Indian friends are all in private schools.  

12
October 4, 2013 10:52 AM
In Response to My name is Sonny

"Sonny" on a name tag would give me pause, too.  Rather than asking about it or doing any interpretive dance, I'd probably just avoid using his name, but I would have a hard time calling him Sonny for the same reason I'd have a hard time calling a person of color "Boy."  "Sonny" seems like a disparaging nickname.  It reminds me of that ad about Mr. Dumass: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMe3WDmxBEI.  I'd rather ask than accidentally insult. 

13
October 4, 2013 10:37 AM
In Response to Preschool class

My son's elementary school had a party last week and I was able to snap a pic of names of three of the 4 kindergarten classes.  We have:

Teacher 1: (List appears to be formal names)
Arlene 
Elena Maria
Tristan
Wilfredo
Solomon
Gabriella
Ana
Jeffrey
Guadalupe
Jazmin
Kyra
James
Anesu (g)
Justyce
Jairon
Aviva
Orlando
Perla
Jayden
Bradley
Ayana
Justin
Yesly

Teacher 2: (List includes nicknames in parentheses)
Christopher
Anna
Shania
Jada
Naitxy
Tannia
Natan
Elizabeth
Stephany
Lilly
Nathaniel (Boyd)
John
Jaden
Caden
Karmen
Richard
McKylan
Sophia
Maurice
Margaret (Maggie) 
Morgan

Teacher 3: (Names decorating door, names the kids go by)
Jordan
Chelsey
Mariama
Alana
Leyu
Amanda
Ethan
Christian
Chris
Gavin
Jaquelin
Breyonna
Jack 
Andrew
Monserrat
Amber
Mirabel
Caroline
Lam-Dat
David 
Kennedy

Process of elimination - kids from his Pre-K class last year who aren't listed above:
Binisha
Ramon
Domonique
Harper (b)
Camila
Alexis
Estefany
Jusiyah
Jules
Miles
Natalee
Daniela
Victoria 

(Edited for typo) 

14
August 15, 2013 09:54 AM

Well said, laurzella.  I looked the judge up in the TN bar directory and she does not appear to be a member. 

15
August 1, 2013 12:16 PM

My friend Lauren often goes by Lu and another friend has a daughter named Lindsay, whom she calls Lou.  I think just about any L name can have the NN Lou, really.  (Of course, this is coming from someone who calls her son William "Jack.")

Elouise does appear to be climbing quickly, but it's only in the 300s and I wouldn't worry too much about it becoming "too popular" unless you feel strongly about never wanting her to meet another one. Names are SO diverse these days!  Both of my kids have top 10 names for their birth years, but with nicknames.  Neither has had any others with either of their names in their classes. Jack has met a couple of other Jacks out and about and a Jackson and a Will were in his after school care, but we've seen nary an Elizabeth or Evie.  Even if there are 50 other Eloises, chances are you'll know them only as Ellie, Elle, or Ella. 

Naming is hard and you can't predict what will become super popular.  Go with what you love.  

16
August 1, 2013 11:56 AM

A+

17
May 15, 2013 01:40 PM
In Response to Hurricane names

Has anyone posted a link to this year's hurricane names?  

http://www.wpbf.com/hurricanes/list-2013-hurricane-names/-/8886336/20156376/-/ep1ljo/-/index.html

 

+ Andrea
+ Barry
+ Chantal
+ Dorian
+ Erin
+ Fernand
+ Gabrielle
+ Humberto
+ Ingrid
+ Jerry
+ Karen
+ Lorenzo
+ Melissa
+ Nestor
+ Olga
+ Pablo
+ Rebekah
+ Sebastien
+ Tanya
+ Van
+ Wendy

18
March 22, 2013 08:17 AM
In Response to Names Make the Book

My favorite is Orson Scott Card's Andrew "Ender" Wiggin. I really hope the movie adaptation (set for release in November, looks like) lives up to my astronomic expectations.  Even if it doesn't do the book justice, at least the names will be the same!

19
February 28, 2013 08:06 AM
In Response to Feminizing Justin

How about Jesstin?

20
February 4, 2013 08:54 AM

Last Thursday, I encountered both a Sequoia and a Sequoya (in an urban area in the US.) Struck me as funny after reading this post.