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My Favorite Names
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1
January 10, 2019 05:37 PM

The namematcher suggests

Julia
Emma
Miriam
Victoria
Maya
Amelia
Aurora
Camilla
Lia
Greta
Olivia
Helena
Lila
Emilia
Cecilia
Marina
Ava
Leila
Sasha
Gianna
Ana
Mariah
Daniella
Dahlia
Lilian
Fiona
Athena
Lucia
Nadia
Karina
Keira
Isla
Carissa
Audra
Bianca
Natalia

2
June 7, 2017 01:19 PM
In Response to Lorea

I know of a woman named Lara. The middle a is like the word are. LARR-uh. She is always called Laura (LORE-uh).

It doesn't seem to be something people learn from, either. They get corrected and next time they're right back to saying Laura. Years later, it's still the exact same conversation, like they've never been told it is Lara.

I would predict Lorea going the same way.

I personally guessed it to be LORE-ee-uh, which vaguely seemed like an illness until I realized which word I was associating it with and now I see it as lore-REE-uh, like die-ore-REE-uh, then LORE-ee-uh, then I remind myself it is lor-RAY-a. I don't think it would be as much of a problem in adulthood when the name is primarily spoken with occassional written use.

3
June 7, 2017 12:42 PM

I would not add Lucinda because it feels old.

I wouldn't choose Lucianne because I think it should be Lucy-Anne or Lucy Ann or you should just use Lucienne. In the current spelling, it makes me think of the pronunciation of Louisiana that is loo-zee-ann and I'd constantly associate the child with Louisiana.

I wouldn't choose Lucetta or Luciana because I pronounce them with a ch (loo-chet-uh, loo-chee-aw-nuh) and I don't care for the sound and also find it too distinctively ethnic for an identity that wouldn't match our own.

I wouldn't choose Lucina because I haven't seen it before and don't recognize it as a name, change the way I pronounce it every time I see it (loo-see-nuh, loo-chee-nuh), and don't care for the sound of it either way.

I find Lucienne (loo-see-ehn) too cultural/ethnic specific that we don't share and would not ultimately choose it for that reason, though I'd smile if I heard it in another family.

I would add Lucia (loo-see-uh) to the list and would be likely to choose it despite two in our close circle sharing the name, though they are coincidentally several years older. It would strike the right balance of uncommon but recognized and known, expressing identity without confining it, inspiring connections without being overpowered by them, and simply sounding lovely to the ear.

4
May 22, 2017 11:45 PM

All but Betty (which is lovely except for the BS initials I wouldn't be able to get over) sound 1980s Disney to me, but Briar Oak was the one that made me do a double take. It sounds straight up Disney Princess meets Woodland Elf embodied in a Warrior Cat.

The fact that others said Briar has "gone girl" and is on the rise in addition would make me want to give a slightly more unremarkable name in the middle in case he wanted to use the middle as an alternative later in life. Even a more esoteric name like Frankinsence could provide a solid nickname, but Oak doesn't have much to work with.

Would you consider the name Linden as an alternative? Betty and Linden sound wonderful together.

LINDEN
Earnest
Forest
Frost
Robin
Ocean
Hart
Steele 

BRIAR
Sage
Shae
Shade
Slate
Stone
Storm

ROBIN
Frost
Pen
Wilder
Moses or Mossimo (nn Moss)
Orion 

5
May 22, 2017 10:53 PM

Marcelino
Leonardo
Theodore
Darcy
Zechariah
Nathaniel
Alexander
Devereau
Laurence
Santiago

An interesting side note, I find that certain names flow better in a certain order.
Emmeline, Juliette, and Marcelino
Laurence, Emmeline, and Juliette
Emmeline, Darcy, and Juliette
I recommend trying any name you're considering out in all the positions to see if it sounds better in one than the others. 

6
April 9, 2017 03:48 PM
In Response to Two Cute Names?

This is a fair criticism, although I was restricting the offered names to those which use the poster's desired sound of Nora which is limited to northern Europe and it's diaspora. The use of rhyming names above is far more inclusive.

7
April 9, 2017 09:58 AM
In Response to Two Cute Names?

Lenora is off the list then! :) 

The trend this year for girls' names is to mask their physical attributes with gender-neutral or masculine names which do not reflect ethnicity, nationality, or religion. If she will be living in a pocket where Sanorah is more naturally accepted than Elliot, Emerson, Sailor, and Sloane, then it makes more sense to use it. You should be aware when she moves out of that pocket that a large section of her peers will have names and experienes that express individuality by blending in and not by standing out. There's no value (right or wrong) in this, just awareness of the cultural trend.

8
April 9, 2017 09:28 AM
In Response to Two Cute Names?

I don't tend to call any names tacky, but adding a letter or syllable to the front of a name (like La or D') is generally associated with belonging to a lower class and/or minority ethnic group and not with making a name one's own.

How many girls named Honora or Lenore do you know? Have you ever met one? I don't think you need to worry about such a name not being able to be your daughter's own. Instead, you want to make sure she can make it her own and not that the name is so big or unusual that it makes her identity for her, with the name detracting from or framing the person she is.

9
April 9, 2017 08:25 AM
In Response to Are These Too Close?

So Hebrew is closer to Stella without a T?

I don't read IPA well. How is Wikipedia saying it is pronounced? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selah

Selah (/ˈsiːlə/ or /ˈsiːləh/ with pronounced audible H; Hebrew: סֶלָה‎‎, also transliterated as selāh)

10
April 9, 2017 08:07 AM
In Response to Two Cute Names?

I responded to Selah in the other thread so will just address Sanorah here. I keep misreading it to be Sayonara, the Japanese goodbye. Knowing it is wrong, I re-read it and go to Sanoran, like the desert, which I catch myself partway through. Snore-uh? No. Then I carefully re-read and commit my effort to suh-Nora. All to just repeat it seconds later when I see it again. It comes across as difficult, clunky, and lacking in melody or association to me.

Might I suggest some similar names?

Lenora
Leonora
Honora
Eleanora
Norah

You could do two names together as well. Selah Nora. Sadie Honora. Sarah Eleanora. Shay Norah. (Or Shea or Shaye Nora). Sparrow Eleanor. Sorcha Leonora. Sylvie Lenora. Suri Lenore. You'd get a similar sound without the confusion.

11
April 8, 2017 10:56 PM
In Response to Are These Too Close?

I would say the same as NAGA, but I'm curious how you pronounce Selah as there is quite the debate on it's pronunciation. Only one mirrors Leia (SAY-luh, like the first half of the word love) while the others do not.

http://www.whattoexpect.com/forums/baby-name-game/topic/pronunciation-of-quot-selah-quot.html

The Hebrew pronunciation (a language I don't speak) sounds halfway between tse-LUH and say-LAH to me, similar to the name Sarah if it had an increasing stress (<).

https://forvo.com/word/he/selah/

12
April 8, 2017 08:43 AM

Congratulations! Thank you for sharing your joy and little one with us!

13
April 7, 2017 02:18 PM
In Response to Boy name help please

You said, "we decided," so I deduce the child's father is in your lives but you make no mention of his take on the names nor on the dilemma. If he's on board, you both agree. If he isn't, you have a challenge. If you haven't told him, you're setting yourself up for heartbreak to be hashing out your thoughts and making up your mind before talking with him and letting him be a participant in your inner world.

14
April 6, 2017 06:34 PM

HA! The filter allows that ^^ and not e t c! 

15
April 6, 2017 09:06 AM

Yes, bow like a bow and arrow. Az like As The World Turns. Equally stressed. Bo-As

In non-English languages, it's closer to Bow-Oz or Bow-Oss.

16
April 6, 2017 07:12 AM

Kit is so classic a nickname and so distinctively male for me that I wouldn't bat an eye at it. The name that comes to my mind for your family is Nathaniel.

Juliet, John, Charles, James, Patrick, Joshua, Isaac, William, and...

Christopher
Nicholas
George
Samuel
Robert
Martin
Henry
Benjamin
Anthony
Daniel
Alexander
Thomas
Victor
Gabriel
Luke
Johnathan
Andrew
Roman
Matthew
Sebastian
Vincent
Noah
David
Dominic
Lawrence
Norman
Paul
Stephen
Philip
Richard

Christopher Edward, Victor Martin, Lawrence Samuel, Roman Andrew, Matthew Boaz, Paul Richard, Vincent Philip, Thomas Gabriel, Sebastian Paul, Nathaniel Lawrence... the possibilities are endless!

17
April 5, 2017 08:04 PM
In Response to Nickname Help!

Most people answer to several names. The same woman might answer to Mom, Sis, Blondie, Honey, Liza, Elizabeth, and Mrs. Smith throughout the course of her day.

There's nothing wrong with your husband calling her his little Mari, you calling her Beth, and big sis calling her Bethy or Beffy as many toddlers would pronounce it. She'll recognize and answer to them all equally, understanding intuitively that this person is meaning her with this name.

18
April 5, 2017 08:21 AM
In Response to Atlas Martin?

I thought this was a celebrity name spotting, that Chris Martin's daughter Apple had a new sibling named Atlas.

19
April 2, 2017 11:47 PM
In Response to Mads. Yea or nay?

Maddie is an interesting comparison!

You know how Americans instinctively say the word letter as ledder when casually speaking? Butter, let her... we have plenty of other flap T examples. "She set the ledder down in the budder and I led her know how irresponsible that was."

I would group Matea and Matthew and Matt in with Maddie and I would not put Mads in that group as it feels like it is coming from another source. It doesn't feel like a flap T/soft D short name for Matthew in American English to me. Maddie is an example where we would change the T to a D sound, but Matt to Mads pronounced Mas is just not one you'd see or expect or be able to explain in English.

That in itself doesn't affect it's viability to me. So you'd have to explain that it is Danish and this is how it is pronounced. No big deal.

It's that Americans will have a strong association with a negative connotation which I believe will override your explanation of the pronunciation to the point of affecting personal identity that I think is a big enough deal to question it. The psychiatric label of being "mad" hadn't occured to me, and the stigma of such words is thankfully declining, but I think you're right that it should be added to the list of comments he would undoubtedly hear with some degree of annoying regularity on his name.

20
April 2, 2017 11:10 AM
In Response to Mads. Yea or nay?

As a nickname, I'm in the camp of Not My Style But If It Floats Your Boat, Whatever.

As a full given name, Mads is too evocative of the emotion and makes me think of your kid as an Inside Out Anger avatar. I would actually assume it was a nickname for somthing like Maddox or Madsen because someone giving that as a full name would never spontaneously occur to me, not knowing the Danish history of its use.

I cringe to think of how many times people would encourage or repress his expressions of emotion by using his name to define him. It would be really bad as a toddler through preschooler when children, especially little boys, are forming that part of themselves and working through how to express their inner experiences, but I predict it being an annoying continuation into adulthood. "He's really living up to his name today." "You're awfully perky for someone named Mads!" If he was born with an introverted, somber, or generally choleric personality in addition, it would be terribly suited and could really cause some identity issues with others or himself.