-n Given Name with -n Surname?

Our surname is a three-syllable Scandinavian surname with an -sen ending...think Eriksen or Jorgensen. We also happen to love quite a few given names (both boy and girl) ending with -an/-en. 

My question is: does a combination like Roman Jorgensen or Arden Eriksen sound too sing-songy or repetitive? What about if it's a combination like Julian Eriksen or Vivian Jorgensen (since that's three syllables each)? Or am I just being too OCD about this? 

Replies

1
April 15, 2015 1:09 AM

We have an -en ending surname (3 syllables), and we used an -n given name (also 3 syllables) for our eldest. It was not our preference, but we decided in the end that it wasn't deal-breaker terrible, either. No one has ever commented on it.

2
April 15, 2015 3:03 AM

It's worth noting that -n names are really really popular for boys right now, so I think that brains are less poised to recognize it as a pattern than it would be if it were another, more eye-catching ending. We judged names on a case-by-case basis - the number of syllables and the emphasis and what vowel preceeds the -n all seemed to make a difference in whether it worked with our surname.

3
By mk
April 15, 2015 1:49 AM

Those just sound like regular, fine names. I wouldn't even have noticed that both end with -n.

4
June 18, 2015 2:20 PM

This is belated, but thanks so much for the feedback! 

5
By Eko
June 22, 2015 12:17 PM

I don't think both names ending in -n is a problem. But I live in Sweden and of course last names ending in -n is really common here and all those people just can't avoid first names ending in -n. ;-)

Actually my first name, middle name AND last jame all three end in n-sound and I never even realised that until I started reading this forum and saw people concerned with this. My name is something like Robin Vivianne Jensen (but not really those names).

My partner also have -n names as the first and last name, it's sort of like Robin Hans Jorgensson (but it's not exactly these names).

6
June 22, 2015 10:48 PM

Wow, thanks for the perspective from Sweden! We both have Swedish heritage (although the -sen name is probably not Swedish), so it's cool to hear from that country. :)

7
June 24, 2015 7:44 AM

I think because there are 3 syllables to break up the repeated sound, you're safe with an N ending name. But some N ending name may sound better than others with your surname, so keep that in mind.