Tasmin VS Tamsin VS Tasnim

I wanted to honour my dad, Thomas and have been looking into these female names.

Thoughts? My last name is Lee.

Thanks!

Replies

1
September 8, 2013 12:03 AM

Of those three, I would choose Tamsin unless you are Arabic, then likely Tasnim.

Personally, I like Thomasina better than any of those though.

2
September 8, 2013 12:15 AM

I would pick Tamsin, without question. I think that it's a really lovely name!

When I see Tasmin, I always think that it looks like a typo for Tamsin. (Plus, it makes me think of the Tasmanian Devil.) Tasnim is okay, but since I already really like Tamsin, it doesn't do it for me as much in comparison. I also think that getting the right pronunciation would be a challenge. 

3
By EVie
September 8, 2013 12:29 AM

Tamsin would definitely be my pick, as it's a traditional female form of Thomas (via a contraction of Thomasina).

I didn't even know that Tasnim was a name, so I learned something today :) However, it's of Arabic origin and of no relation to Thomas, so I think Tamsin is a better pick to honor your dad. Also, I'm not sure how Tasnim is pronounced, but I would guess it's tas-NEEM, as opposed to Tamsin, which is TAM-sin.

Tasmin, on the other hand, doesn't seem to be a name at all, or at least I can't find any documentation of it, so I would definitely stay away from that. 

In general—Tamsin is not a very commonly heard name, but it's still much more familiar than the other two, and you would probably get a lot of people mis-reading the others as Tamsin.

4
September 8, 2013 12:51 AM

Thanks everyone for your reply!  

I'm now confused... 

Is Tamsin pronounced T-AAm-sin or T-AHm-sin?  I know the name is more popular in the UK so I'm beginning to think it's the latter.  In which case, I'm wondering if Americans will know how to pronouce is properly.  

5
By EVie
September 8, 2013 1:10 AM

Tam rhymes with "ham." It's not the same as the first syllable of Thomas. Tam is actually a traditional Scottish nickname for Thomas. I always thought that Tamsin was a Scottish form as well, but behindthename.com says Cornish—anyone know?

Apparently there's also a novel called Tamsin by Peter S. Beagle (most famous as the author of The Last Unicorn). I haven't read it, but now I will have to put it on my list.

6
September 8, 2013 1:05 AM

Also... Does Tamsin Lee sound weird?  

Saying it quickly sounds a bit like 'Damsely".

7
By mk
September 8, 2013 5:59 PM

No, it doesn't sound weird.

8
September 8, 2013 8:13 PM

I think that it sounds great, actually. (Names that end in the -ee sound are less than ideal, in my opinion.)